Hacking News (26 Posts)

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A Physical Solution to a Software Problem

Thinkst is a small security organisation and one of its member recently published a post on their blog regarding the security of an encrypted USB drive. One of his friend lost the password to his USB Freecom Self Encrypted Drive (SED) drive and one of the protection in place was the need to power cycle the hard drive after every 5 bad attempts. This meant a brute force attack was impossible due to the time to plug/unplug the device.

Here comesingenuity, although the author call this a “lame hack”, I actually really like it as he thought outside the box (pun intended). He basically build a new controller to automatically power cycle the drive, and managed to find the lost password after 500 attempts.

I don’t do electronics and am always impressed when hack...
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An interesting timeline representation of the CloudFlare’s hack

CloudFlare is an interesting young company, a few years old, as introduced in this Bloomberg article. Although it is tempting to just describe it as being similar to Akamaibecauseit provides web acceleration and DOS protection through the use of a Content Distributed Network (CDN), it is also different. As explained by its founder, Matthew Price, it can understand, analyse and protect all requests to a website, not just a subset. It also has a different price model starting with a free offering and generally being much less expensive than the competition even with its pro/business/enterprise options.

In a nutshell, CloudFlare appears to be a service that can help optim...
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Flame and the DEB93D trail

In the last few weeks there has been a lot of noise about what looks like the latest State sponsored malware, Flame. You can find a lot of information about it from Kaspersky and also from the CrySyS lab who seems to have done some parallel investigation and call it differently (sKyWIper).

This malware is quite interesting for several reasons:
1) It seems to focus on stealing information rather than being directly disruptive.
2) It has been active for 5+ years and has remained undetected until now.
3) It has an option to delete itself, but in doing so leaves one file. a ~DEB93D.tmp file.
4) It is modular and can/has been used to intercept Microsoft update using fake certificates t...
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Windows 8 Picture Password, great but…

After looking at the new features listed for Windows 8, one in particular caught my attention: The Picture Password Login.
It is a very refreshing approach to authentication!

You are presented with a photo at log in and instead of entering a password, you have to touch the image according to the “allowed” touch sequence you registered your user with. In some respect it is similar to the existing gesture based authentication mechanisms you can find on some smartphones (anyone remember that feature on the Palm V?!), but I think it is taken to the next step.
Microsoft is maybe trying to do to passwords what Apple did to the Walkman.

By providing you with a photo of your choice (i.e.: your own family picture), and a restricted number of gestures (point, draw a line and circle) it is easier to remember a sequence, more natural and more personal. For exemple, you would circle the head of your best friend, touch the feet of your child and stroke your dog&...
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Another iPhone hack, this time with a paperclip!

There is a new vulnerability with iOS5 powered device with a SIM card. I have tried it and it works.
You need to know the number of your victim and by combining a missed called, removing the SIM card, putting it back in and swiping the missed call alert it is possible to bypass the lock screen and access the phone.

Look at the video from the weirdly named group called iPhoneIslam, you need to get the timing right!

YouTube Direkt

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Smile, you are being recorded!

The BBC has recently ran an article about a hacker who has published details on how to hack a certain type of webcam. This story is interesting for several reasons.

First, it further highlights how fragile our privacy has become since we live in a digital world with details of our life being kept on the internet: personal blogs, twitter feeds, Facebook or Government/Health records, etc. All this data is available online if you have the right access to the system it is held on. But it is not just still photos or lines of texts, it can also be live pictures through personal webcams or state surveillance cameras. Again, that data is available if you have the right credentials. In this case, hundreds of Trendnet webcam users thought/thinks their live video feed was protected through the use of a userid and password, but a bug in its firmware allows anyone to access it by...
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Most websites are vulnerable to a hash collision DOS attack

By websites, I should really have said Web Applications, but the end result is the same: A server which is serving pages on the Internet could see its CPU usage increasing to a level making that server unusable for a few minutes or more. All that from a relatively small specially crafted malicious HTTP request.

This vulnerability exists in most languages used to develop web applications: PHP, ASP.Net, Java, Python, Ruby, etc. And it has been known to exist in theory since 2003!

Last week, Alexander Klink and Julian Wälde explained at the 28th Chaos Communication Congress in Germany how exactly the theory became reality and the impact on the different web application languages were affected.

The core of the issue is the way hash lists have been implemented in those languages. By “Hash” they both refer to a specific type of data structure and the cryptographic function. A >>[READ MORE]


iOS 5 Vulnerabilities for iPad2 and iPhone 4S

Two vulnerabilities in iOS5 have recently been discovered, one is affecting the iPad2 and the other the new iPhone 4S. In both cases it allows anyone to bypass any lock/passcode to gain unauthorised access to the device.

1) iPad 2 + iOS5 + SmartCover = Anyone can unlock your iPAD
This only affects iPad2 with iOS5 and the smart cover set to automatically lock the device.
With a locked iPad2, keep pressing the power button until you see the screen telling you to swipe to turn off, close the smart cover, reopen it and push the CANCEL button.
This will give you access to the latest application that was used. It means that if you were on the application listing screen you will be able to see all the applications installed on the iPad, but you will not be able to open any otherapplications. This is because you are in the “finder”/”Explorer” application.
But it also means that if before you closed your smart cover to lock ...
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GPU Password Cracking

Brute force password cracking has been around for a while but in the last few years a new way to use your brand new graphic card has emerged which brings high performance attacks against passwords much cheaper and easier.

This is because the “brain” of those graphical card, The Graphical Processing Unit or GPU, is designed to handle mathematical and repetitive tasks very efficiently.

There is a very good article about this topic on the ERRATA SECURITY blog with some interesting facts:

– Although GPU are now found in most electronic devices (i.e.: phones), dedicated PC cards are obviously better

– Radeon is better than GeForce

– Although you can use more than one GPU, the benefits are not exponential and most people only need 1 or 2 GPU.

– This is because past 8 Characters, a password become near impossible to brute force....
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An interesting attack on Voice Over IP Security

I just came accross an interesting attack on the Secure Real Time Protocol (SRTP) using Variable Bit Rate codecs (VBR). That protocol is used to secure voice or IP communication by encrypting the transmitted data.

The attack is described in this draft paper but for the the full details you should take a look at the very comprehensive white paper here which dates back to 2008.

It usesthe phoneticpronunciation of words to identify patterns in the VBR encoding which can be used to bypass encryption and identify phrases as well as the language spoken. So this attack does not target individual words, but phrases or sentences.

Although the paper claims in some cases a success rate of 90% it has an average of 50% success, which is already good enough! What is ...
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