Conferences News (14 Posts)

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My take on SANS 660, The HexFactor and Netwars

I have just attended the SANS 660 course in London, it is one of the most advanced course SANS has to offer and it did notdisappoint!

Its bootcamp format means you will start your day at 9am and finish it at 7pm! The last two hours being called a “bootcamp”, basically 2 hours of exercises linked to the content of the day that really helps understanding the different techniques that were discussed.

Speaking about content, although they state that previous programmingexperienceis “recommended”, it is not, is it mandatory!

And for the last 2 days you really need some understanding of x86 assembly to get a chance to follow the fast pace. I have to admit that the last day I was lost after lunch!

But what do you get if you buckle up and go on the ride? You get an incredible amount of information as it goes into a great level o...
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SANS Ondemand Training course: A few Tips

I went to a SANS Forensic course (508) last year and a few weeks ago I decided to try something new… to stay at home and dedicate 5 days to do their Ethical Wireless Hacking training course (617).

Let me first say that the 617 training course was really good, the author of the course and the recordings were made by Joshua Wright who runs the http://www.willhackforsushi.com blog. He is very knowledgeable and his enthusiasm was even contagious through audio only. In fact this is a huge understatement! I was truly amazed by his skills, stories and training delivery!
So much that for 7 days I was up at 9am and worked until 2am each day on the different content material covered by the course.

As I almost lost my sanity and started dreaming of ToDS/FromDS bits and fuzzing I thought I would share a few tips on this type of training course.

– Check the last time the course was updated, and if there is an upco...
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The world of Computer Forensics

I have recently attended a SANS Forensic course in London. It was the best training course I have ever been to, not only the content was really interesting and very well delivered but all the extra activities surrounding the training course were outstanding (presentations, challenges, social events, etc).

Forensic was new to me and I found the techniques taught as very good eye openers in two different ways:

–Forensic techniques can be applied to other area of IT security than just forensic investigations, such as malware analysis and DLP. The latter was a bit of a surprise to me, but by understanding some of the forensic techniques you can also understand how part of a DLP engine would work when searching for specific files on filesystems (at rest) and recognised/tagged when on the network (on the move). I will find it interesting to see if my new know...
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IDC’s IT Security Conference 2010 – My take on it.

Yesterday I attended the IDC Security Conference in London.

I was not too sure what to think of it as I never attended that event before and only accepted a “spam/unsolicited invite” because for once I took the time to read the agenda and list of speakers who were to attend.

I can now say I do not regret it and it was a great conference with lot of interesting content on the future security context related to cloud and mobile computing with a pinch of data privacy.

One of the reason I decided to attend was also because the keynote speaker was Bruce Schneier, a person I never had the privilege to see at a conference before and whom I appreciate his offbeat approach to IT Security.

Although I have attached a mindmap of my conference notes at the end of the post, if you do not want to see a “Death by MindMap” or have a 50inch screen then I invite you to read the many highlights and industry insights which were discussed at that conferenc...
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